322 Fairall St Ajax, Ontario
289-275-0250

Weekdays: 8:30am - 4:30pm
Saturdays: 10am - 3pm

New Used, Demo, and Overstock Hot Tubs arriving weekly! – Used Swim Spas coming soon!

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Chemicals

buttonFor the first time spa owner, the thought of working with chemicals might seem confusing or uncomfortable. Let us assure you that technology has made this chore incredible safe and easy.

A hot tub, in itself, is pretty simple:

  • There are pumps that drive water through the hoses and out the jet nozzles into the tub and other pumps that suck the water back into the pressure system;
  • There’s a heating system that the water passes through to raise its temperature; and
  • There’s a filtering system to make sure that ONLY water makes its way back into the system.

The common denominator in all of these systems is the water.

And, unlike your bath tub at home where you put fresh water in each time, the water in your hot tube will only get changed 2 to 3 times a year. So, we need to make sure that it remains as pure and free from contaminates as possible – making it safe for us, humans, as well as for the equipment that has to move it about inside.

To do this, we need to follow 4 simple steps at least once a week.

Step 1 – Establish the proper pH level

pH measures how acidic your water is. If this isn’t balanced then you risk damaging your equipment, in particular heating elements, pump seals and the internal works on gas fired heaters.

The proper pH level for your hot tub should be between 7.2 and 7.8

All you have to do is dip a test strip in the water and compare the color to a chart that we’ll provide for you. Then, you follow a simple set of instructions to add a pH balancing agent.

High pH Readings Low pH Readings
Poor Sanitizer Efficiency Poor Sanitizer Efficiency
Cloudy Water Corroded Metals/Equipment
Scale Formation Skin & Eye Irritation
Shorter Filter Runs Etched or Stained Plaster (inground)
Skin & Eye Irritations Destruction of Total Alkalinity

Step 2 – Measure Total Alkalinity

Alkalinity is the chemical mechanism that allows you to control your pH balance.

The ideal range is 80 to 120 parts per million.

All you have to do is dip a test strip in the water and compare the color to a chart that we’ll provide for you. Then, you follow a simple set of instructions to add an alkaline balancing agent.

High Total Alkalinity Low Total ReaAlkalinitydings
Hard To Change pH Rapid Changes In pH
Scale Formation Corroded Metals/Equipment
Cloudy Water Skin & Eye Irritation
Skin & Eye Irritation
Poor Sanitizer Efficiency

Step 3 – Controlling the hardness of your water (Calcium)

Now, we need to measure the minerals in your water including calcium and magnesium. Water needs to have some degree of “hardness”. But, too much and your equipment suffers not to mention scale and water foaming.

The calcium level should be between 100 to 250 parts per million.

If you have “soft water” then you may need to add calcium.

Step 4 – Sanitizing

You want to keep your water clean with chlorine at a ratio of about 3 to 5 parts per million. That’s about 2 tea spoons to start with.


When in doubt, call us! We’re here to help.